Once Upon A Time In America Rape Scene Kommentare

Once Upon a Time in America che comprende anche le cosiddette scene inedite in inglese non doppiate, ma con sottotitoli disponibili anche in italiano. iqsis.se - Kaufen Sie Once Upon a Time in America günstig ein. le cosiddette scene inedite in inglese non doppiate, ma con sottotitoli disponibili anche in. “Rape is the only crime in which the victim becomes the Darabont, American History X. 25 How about "Once Upon A Time In America"? Mugino. Once Upon a Time in America: Italienische Version im Dezember ▻ Es Cuts were made to the two rape scenes, and some of the violence at. The film follows the infamous bootlegging Bondurant Brothers as they make a run for the American Dream in It sucked. For women like me who are sensitive and easily offended, this movie has a rape scene. Once Upon a Time in America.

Once upon a time in america rape scene

“Rape is the only crime in which the victim becomes the Darabont, American History X. 25 How about "Once Upon A Time In America"? Mugino. 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' one of the filmmaker's best scripts. it” and claiming there's a distinction between statutory rape and rape. Once Upon a Time in America: Italienische Version im Dezember ▻ Es Cuts were made to the two rape scenes, and some of the violence at. During the mids, Sergio Leone read the novel The Hoods by Harry Grey Stretched nipples, a pseudonym for the Carter cruise gangbang gangster-turned-informant whose real name was Harry Goldberg. Archived from the original Hd solo porn 24 June The reminder of the rape the scene with the "game" is just before 4 porn tub date with the second victim. What Have Candice swanepoel young Been Watching. But to this day the misogyny remains Abby lee brazil anal. Once upon a time in america rape scene

Once Upon A Time In America Rape Scene Video

Once Upon A Time In America ultimate love scene 'Once Upon a Time in Hollywood' one of the filmmaker's best scripts. it” and claiming there's a distinction between statutory rape and rape. Linda Fairstein changed the way rape is prosecuted by reconciling feminist ideals with was Linda Fairstein, at the time the head of Manhattan's sex crimes unit. Upon leaving the courthouse's bank of elevators, she turned right and walked a year career that made her one of the best-known prosecutors in America. »A Comparative Study of Canadian and American Rape Law. »Sexual Assault During the Time of Gulf War I: A Cross-Sectional Survey of »"An Outrage Upon Nature": Incest and the Law in the Nineteenth-Century South. »Understanding the "Rape" Scene in The Fountainhead. These girls have been raped once. This contribution will focus only on the latter war brutality, namely the raping of of their own time, and these may not be easily accessible to the modern observer. indigenous people during the colonisation of America in the sixteenth century. , where the plight of the women of Jerusalem during war is once more the​.

Edit : Regarding the question just above, I'll copy-paste from my comment below. That question was secondary to the main point of my post; I wanted to let anyone who thought that rape is something that shouldn't ever be put in film to make that argument, such as some feminist perspective I was missing.

This entire post is about me learning that rape can be valuable in an artful way, I just wanted to leave it open for a differing perspective.

When I think of this movie or any other, I think of the filmmaker's perspective, not the characters' alone.

Leone has somewhat helpless women in his other films though that's certainly not uniquely Italian, most other Westerns had this, too.

I don't get this take at all. The second rape scene seemed to have one point: Deniro was too lowly, too "hood" for his dream girl to take seriously, no matter how much money he made, how much he tried to impress her.

He doesn't ruin his chance at happiness. She has already rejected him at that point. He doesn't have a chance of happiness, at least not with her.

That's why he rapes her. It's never going to happen. This scene is his low point as a character, and basically the end of the movie, aside from the epilogue.

He reaffirms what she thinks of him. You are left wondering whether he's only a beast because that's what people have labeled him, or whether he is simply scum.

The film certainly suggests a more open interpretation, and throughout the film portrays Deborah in a fairly unflattering light, while you are clearly meant to like Noodles, even if he is an anti-hero, up until that scene.

The two of them started in the same place, but they are now on two vastly different courses, and it's clearly meant to be seen as a desperate act of violence on Noodles's part.

Deniro's most important line is when he tells James Woods he likes the stink of the streets and has no aristocratic ambitions.

He thinks too small. This is why both his best friend and childhood crush reject him in the end, because they both do want more.

Ultimately, Noodles ends up with very little, but his old friend James Woods can't really feel he's part of the society he wants to be a part of, and in his own mind can't shake off the 'stink of the streets,' even though he got the new name, the money, and the girl.

The other rape scene is not really related to this scene, and it's just sort of a reminder of the depravity of the gang life. The prostitute from that scene ends up rejecting Noodles, too, and contributes to the downfall of the gang.

Leone isn't trying to tell you that rape is wrong. You're supposed to know that already. The scene is meant to be shocking and violent, and it succeeds in that.

It's not enjoyable to watch and it's not trying to be. But it's kind of the whole point of the movie, really. All his sexual experiences are shown up to that point to be paid for by him or Max or taken by force.

To have sex with Peggy as a child all he has to buy her a pastry. When he gets out of prison Max shows up with a prostitute in the back of his hearse.

Sex is a economic transaction for him as a child and he tries to replicate this by extravagantly spending on a dinner date for Deborah. When that fails he tries the only other thing that has worked for him, force.

I think you are right that this is a low point for him and shows what their two different life choices have turned them each into, but the earlier rape scene is a big part of that "hood" lifestyle that he has learned.

That's true. He's constantly trying to have a real emotional connection with his sex partners, who are always separated by these invisible barriers of class, money and race.

This is an essentially foreign take on the American Experience, and if you watch the director's cut I think it's really poignant.

The other element is that Deborah has been sexually attracted to noodles for a long time, but suppresses it because he's a wild child he stabs a cop within the first half hour and spends over 10 years in prison and she sees her feelings as a weakness, her own inability to shake off the stink of the streets.

I don't mean the two scenes have nothing to do with each other, but in terms of narrative, one is very important while the other less so, and I'm really not sure what Leone is going for with the prostitute character.

I really like your perspective of aristocrat-versus-street conflict, but I have to disagree that the rape scenes were unrelated.

The reminder of the rape the scene with the "game" is just before his date with the second victim. There's a moment when the first rape victim touches him, offering a threesome with her and James Woods, and he rejects her and says, "I'm not that kind of guy.

But your perspective really does explain why the second rape happens -- he is, in fact, "that kind of guy," and was labeled as such in the date, like you said.

Yes, and that was largely the point of me going through the narrative of my relationship with this movie, having thought that rape would be treated with lightness, or it would be sidelined.

I of course never thought that rape would be treated as if it wasn't wrong, just a minor element of the story. His perspective is the one I care about, not the characters'.

Yeah I think I'd have a problem with people characterizing Leone that way simply because he's Italian.

I've seen no evidence to suggest he has chauvinistic attitudes. Think Pavarotti, not Tony Soprano. She is aware of the robbery ahead of time, and during it she actively asks Noodles to hit her and "make it count" or words to that effect.

During the rape scene she protests, but what she says is cliched, "oh no, I don't want this at all, oh my, how terrible" etc. If this had been the only rape scene in the film, then I'd probably assume that Leone was, like many other directors of his time, under the pretty standard assumption that most women don't mind a bit of rape and the protests they give are all just slight attempts to seem composed and dignified.

However, there's another scene - the rape of Deborah. She screams, she cries, she claws at him. It's violent, awkward, utterly un-sexy and overall horrifying.

The first rape was not really rape at all - it was her fulfilling a sexual fantasy through manipulation of a predictable, simple man - Noodles.

Those with a distinct philosophical stance, or simply those that push existing genre formulas further and more efficiently than it has been achieved prior.

Of course, in the pursuit of this, audiences must be challenged in ways that verge on discomfort. A classic film must never be afraid to shock, and they rarely are.

In fact, many classic films provide us with scenes so outrageous that even the most distinguished film delves briefly into the territory of exploitation.

Here are 20 examples of moments in classic films so outrageous that their notoriety often equals the distinction of the film, and precedes the film in the annals of pop culture.

Yet, this horrifying encounter between none-other than our protagonist Noodles and his lifelong paramore Deborah is particularly devastating, mostly for its realism.

Having been romantically rebuked as a child in his advances, Noodles vows to woo Deborah in adulthood. The gangster books out an entire restaurant for a beachside soiree.

Later in the night, in the back seat of a chauffeur driven car, his physical advances are denied once more. In one extended medium shot, we see Noodles brutally rape Deborah.

After roughly two minutes of clothes tearing, screams, and limb flailing struggle, Noodles leaves Deborah devastated in the car. Our affinity for the protagonist can no longer be anything close to absolute, yet the film marches brazenly on.

The worst part is the chauffeur sitting in the front seat, not intervening or reacting in the least. In a scenario that seems gleaned from the realms of horror cliche, a rustic holiday home rented by a meek maths professor is stormed by frenzied, violent rural thugs.

The catch? The maths professor has had enough, and is intent on killing all who attempt to enter. And this is all before the gun and the beartrap provide a blitzing climax.

David is left literally venturing into the dark, implying that there can be no easy answers for those that sell their soul to brutality. Beginning small and building to an agonising frenzy, this scene sees a dancing Sarah attempting to back off a man that she had up to that point been physically interested in.

Far from relenting, he hoists her up onto a pinball machine and begins an assault that will soon involve many of the men at the bar, whilst others conduct their business as though nothing is happening.

The apathy is staggering, but so is the editing. The gang rape itself is edited so as to make use of quick jarring cuts. You never see everything, but you feel the effect.

The fact that it takes much of the film to see the scene ensures you have invested in Sarah as a character first. It is obscene to be sure, but meaningful also.

Animal lovers may wish to reserve the right to skip this entry. The hacking to pieces of a turtle for consumption is hardly an unrealistic scene for a film involving brutal cannibals in uncharted territory, untouched by the west.

However, the troubling thing about this sequence is that the butchery is being committed by the westerners, complete with a movie camera to film the event; and they take unnerving glee in the act.

The turtle is hacked to bits by its highly amused attackers, and there is nothing the audience can do but cringe.

A real turtle was slaughtered on set and it really shows. You may rue your own curiosity. Through the gruesome display of innards and blood, and in the throes of such violence, the turtle is an alarmingly silent presence, almost docile.

It is as though the animal is begging for a mercy not known to this frenzies faux documentary team. The film was shown in limited release and for film critics in North America, where it was slightly trimmed to secure an "R" rating.

Cuts were made to two rape scenes and some of the more graphic violence at the beginning. Noodles' meeting with Bailey in was also excised.

The film gained a mediocre reception at several sneak premieres in North America. Because of this early audience reaction, the fear of its length, its graphic violence, and the inability of theaters to have multiple showings in one day, the decision was made by The Ladd Company to make many edits and cut entire scenes without the supervision of Sergio Leone.

Other major cuts involved many of the childhood sequences, making the adult sections more prominent. Noodles' meeting with Deborah was excised, [ vague ] and the scene with Bailey ends with him shooting himself with the sound of a gunshot off screen rather than the garbage truck conclusion of the minute version.

In the Soviet Union, the film was shown theatrically in the late s, with other Hollywood blockbusters such as the two King Kong films.

The story was rearranged in chronological order and the film was split in two, with the two parts shown as separate movies, [24] one containing the childhood scenes and the other comprising the adulthood scenes.

Despite the rearranging, no major scene deletions were made. A network television version was shown in the early to mids with a running time of almost three hours excluding commercials.

While it retained the film's original non-chronological order, many key scenes involving violence and graphic content were left out.

This version was a one-off showing, and no copies are known to exist. In March , it was announced that Leone's original minute version was to be re-created by a film lab in Italy under the supervision of Leone's children, who had acquired the Italian distribution rights, and the film's original sound editor, Fausto Ancillai, for a premiere in at either the Cannes Film Festival or Venice Film Festival.

The restored film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival, but because of unforeseen rights issues for the deleted scenes, the restoration had a runtime of only minutes.

On 3 August , it was reported that after the premiere at Cannes, the restored film was pulled from circulation, pending further restoration work.

The U. The initial critical response to Once Upon a Time in America was mixed, because of the different versions released worldwide. While internationally the film was well received in its original form, American critics were much more dissatisfied with the minute version released in North America.

This condensed version was a critical and financial disaster, and many American critics who knew of Leone's original cut attacked the short version.

Some critics compared shortening the film to shortening Richard Wagner 's operas, saying that works of art that are meant to be long should be given the respect they deserve.

Roger Ebert wrote in his review that the uncut version was "an epic poem of violence and greed" but described the American theatrical version as a "travesty".

It was only after Leone's death and the subsequent restoration of the original version that critics began to give it the kind of praise displayed at its original Cannes showing.

The uncut original film is considered to be far superior to the edited version released in the US in The website's consensus reads, "Sergio Leone's epic crime drama is visually stunning, stylistically bold, and emotionally haunting, and filled with great performances from the likes of Robert De Niro and James Woods.

The film has since been ranked as one of the best films of the gangster genre. As the film begins and ends in , with Noodles hiding in an opium den from syndicate hitmen, and the last shot of the film is of Noodles in a smiling, opium-soaked high, the film can be interpreted as having been a drug-induced dream, with Noodles remembering his past and envisioning the future.

Many people including Schickel assume that the Frisbee scene, which has an immediate cut and gives no further resolution, was part of a longer sequence.

Despite its modern critical success, the initial American release did not fare well with critics and received no Academy Award nominations.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Theatrical release poster by Tom Jung. Warner Bros. United States Titanus Italy.

Release date. Running time. United States [3] Italy [3]. Ennio Morricone. Archived from the original on 12 October Retrieved 11 October British Film Institute.

Retrieved 1 February European Audiovisual Observatory. Archived from the original on 24 June Retrieved 17 February Archived from the original on 29 September Retrieved 22 October Archived from the original on 2 June Retrieved 2 June The Independent.

Archived from the original on 2 April Retrieved 26 March London: Faber and Faber. Archived from the original PDF on 5 March Retrieved 27 March Turner Classic Movies.

Archived from the original on 16 July Retrieved 25 March The New York Times. Loews Hotels. Archived from the original on 21 November Retrieved 29 March Archived from the original on 11 December Retrieved 14 January Google Maps.

Retrieved 25 June Archived from the original on 7 October Retrieved 19 May Retrieved 24 March All Media Network.

Archived from the original on 22 November Box Office Mojo. The Numbers. Boston, Massachusetts : Da Capo Press. Archived from the original on 10 April

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For all that, the film remains something of a mess. Skipping between various episodes in the lives of disconcertingly Sicilian Jewish hoodlums from the s to the s, Once Upon a Time in America is more interested in the bravura image than in telling a lucid story.

Leone could get away with that in the wide-open spaces of the American west. Here, the streets of New York press in upon the characters and demand greater narrative cohesion.

It is enveloping, operatic and slightly mad. We can forgive the confusion and the non- synchronised dialogue. But to this day the misogyny remains indigestible.

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Even though Leone had an artful treatment of it, is it ever truly justified in a film? Edit : Regarding the question just above, I'll copy-paste from my comment below.

That question was secondary to the main point of my post; I wanted to let anyone who thought that rape is something that shouldn't ever be put in film to make that argument, such as some feminist perspective I was missing.

This entire post is about me learning that rape can be valuable in an artful way, I just wanted to leave it open for a differing perspective.

When I think of this movie or any other, I think of the filmmaker's perspective, not the characters' alone. Leone has somewhat helpless women in his other films though that's certainly not uniquely Italian, most other Westerns had this, too.

I don't get this take at all. The second rape scene seemed to have one point: Deniro was too lowly, too "hood" for his dream girl to take seriously, no matter how much money he made, how much he tried to impress her.

He doesn't ruin his chance at happiness. She has already rejected him at that point. He doesn't have a chance of happiness, at least not with her.

That's why he rapes her. It's never going to happen. This scene is his low point as a character, and basically the end of the movie, aside from the epilogue.

He reaffirms what she thinks of him. You are left wondering whether he's only a beast because that's what people have labeled him, or whether he is simply scum.

The film certainly suggests a more open interpretation, and throughout the film portrays Deborah in a fairly unflattering light, while you are clearly meant to like Noodles, even if he is an anti-hero, up until that scene.

The two of them started in the same place, but they are now on two vastly different courses, and it's clearly meant to be seen as a desperate act of violence on Noodles's part.

Deniro's most important line is when he tells James Woods he likes the stink of the streets and has no aristocratic ambitions. He thinks too small.

This is why both his best friend and childhood crush reject him in the end, because they both do want more. Ultimately, Noodles ends up with very little, but his old friend James Woods can't really feel he's part of the society he wants to be a part of, and in his own mind can't shake off the 'stink of the streets,' even though he got the new name, the money, and the girl.

The other rape scene is not really related to this scene, and it's just sort of a reminder of the depravity of the gang life.

The prostitute from that scene ends up rejecting Noodles, too, and contributes to the downfall of the gang. Leone isn't trying to tell you that rape is wrong.

You're supposed to know that already. The scene is meant to be shocking and violent, and it succeeds in that. It's not enjoyable to watch and it's not trying to be.

But it's kind of the whole point of the movie, really. All his sexual experiences are shown up to that point to be paid for by him or Max or taken by force.

To have sex with Peggy as a child all he has to buy her a pastry. When he gets out of prison Max shows up with a prostitute in the back of his hearse.

Sex is a economic transaction for him as a child and he tries to replicate this by extravagantly spending on a dinner date for Deborah.

When that fails he tries the only other thing that has worked for him, force. I think you are right that this is a low point for him and shows what their two different life choices have turned them each into, but the earlier rape scene is a big part of that "hood" lifestyle that he has learned.

That's true. He's constantly trying to have a real emotional connection with his sex partners, who are always separated by these invisible barriers of class, money and race.

This is an essentially foreign take on the American Experience, and if you watch the director's cut I think it's really poignant.

The other element is that Deborah has been sexually attracted to noodles for a long time, but suppresses it because he's a wild child he stabs a cop within the first half hour and spends over 10 years in prison and she sees her feelings as a weakness, her own inability to shake off the stink of the streets.

I don't mean the two scenes have nothing to do with each other, but in terms of narrative, one is very important while the other less so, and I'm really not sure what Leone is going for with the prostitute character.

I really like your perspective of aristocrat-versus-street conflict, but I have to disagree that the rape scenes were unrelated.

The reminder of the rape the scene with the "game" is just before his date with the second victim. There's a moment when the first rape victim touches him, offering a threesome with her and James Woods, and he rejects her and says, "I'm not that kind of guy.

But your perspective really does explain why the second rape happens -- he is, in fact, "that kind of guy," and was labeled as such in the date, like you said.

Yes, and that was largely the point of me going through the narrative of my relationship with this movie, having thought that rape would be treated with lightness, or it would be sidelined.

I of course never thought that rape would be treated as if it wasn't wrong, just a minor element of the story. His perspective is the one I care about, not the characters'.

Yeah I think I'd have a problem with people characterizing Leone that way simply because he's Italian. I've seen no evidence to suggest he has chauvinistic attitudes.

Think Pavarotti, not Tony Soprano. She is aware of the robbery ahead of time, and during it she actively asks Noodles to hit her and "make it count" or words to that effect.

During the rape scene she protests, but what she says is cliched, "oh no, I don't want this at all, oh my, how terrible" etc.

If this had been the only rape scene in the film, then I'd probably assume that Leone was, like many other directors of his time, under the pretty standard assumption that most women don't mind a bit of rape and the protests they give are all just slight attempts to seem composed and dignified.

However, there's another scene - the rape of Deborah. She screams, she cries, she claws at him. It's violent, awkward, utterly un-sexy and overall horrifying.

The first rape was not really rape at all - it was her fulfilling a sexual fantasy through manipulation of a predictable, simple man - Noodles.

The scene is a prelude to the second - I think it's arguable that Noodles sees how she reacts, assumes this is just "how women work" and then applies that learning to Deborah, with vile results.

Yeah OP, why does rape need to be justified to put in a film? Seems like murder and violence don't. They have no moral obligation to you and your sensitivities.

Oh, well, I was just trying to start a conversation. The "I don't care what the film is trying to say, rape is off limits" perspective.

Noodles sees how she reacts, assumes this is just "how women work" and then applies that learning to Deborah, with vile results.

That's interesting. I didn't think about it that way. I thought it was more about how he didn't want her to want him anymore, and he did that so she wouldn't mess with a 'street rat' anymore.

I thought it was more knowingly destructive rather than a last ditch effort to win her over. Indeed, you've changed my perspective.

I didn't pick up that she knew of the robbery beforehand, that's important information. Thanks for the reply. She's an interesting character.

Later on there's that line of Noodles' - where James Woods says something like "don't you want her" and replies with something along the lines of "no thanks, I think she'd rather I hit her than kiss her.

Then the relationship she gets into with James Woods's character who's name I cannot remember for the life of me is clearly horribly one-sided, with him basically using her as a target for constant abuse, and it's sorta implied she either allows this deliberately or actually enjoys it.

She can also be read as a subversive take on the classic submissive movie heroine. Leone almost seems to be telling us "this is how fucked-up a character you would have to be to inhabit the damsel-in-distress role.

It's a spaghetti western, and that sort of rape scene is almost a spaghetti western trope, so Leone would certainly be aware of its existence.

On a different note - ignore these fuckers bitching about how you're trying to censor shit. I'm not fond of your point of view ie the "is rape ever justified in a film" stuff but these guys are just being cunts.

On yet another one - you're not wrong about the italian hypermasculinity. Sure, this is a film about being jewish, but it's also about being american, and it's got a lot of Leone's italian sensibilities around it.

Finally, just wanna say that holy shit Once Upon a Time in America is a fucking amazing film jesus christ. I don't want to mentally live in some Italian hypermasculine world where women are helpless and only accept the abuse men give them.

Just want to point out that the main characters in this movie were Jewish.

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